OutRun Restoration Part 6: Final Tweaks

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The cabinet body has now been repaired and painted, so it’s on to the final stint at last. Next on the list was to put the new t-molding on. The original molding was in bad shape and snapped at the cabinet’s legs. I bought some smooth black 3/4″ t-molding from Arcade World UK and started with the right side panel. When I got to the front of the cabinet I stopped and painted the edges black where the visible t-molding would sit, as the side panels were slightly thicker than the t-molding due to the veneer that had been added on top of the 3/4″ MDF. It’s hardly noticeable that the t-molding is about 1mm thinner than the sides (1/2mm each side), and in places it seems to cover the entire width of the edge anyway, but painting the edges black ensured that you don’t notice it. The other option was to buy some wider t-molding and trim it down, which I thought would end up looking like shit and be more trouble than it’s worth…

painted edges for t-molding


I had to use some sandpaper to widen the groove around the repaired/filled feet, because I didn’t fancy them breaking when I bashed the t-molding in with a rubber mallet. So I widened the groove on the ends of both feet so it would fit easily. Once the t-molding had been stretched around the corners to the bottom of the cab, the tension kept it in the grooves just fine…

t-molding around the restored feet


It wasn’t long before I had both side panels t-molded up. And a huge sigh of relief that I didn’t break the repaired feet…

t-molding applied


Time to sort the floor out next. I unscrewed the very tired looking kickplate and sanded it down from low grit to high grit, then continued to wet sand with higher grits, followed by some Maguire’s Ultimate Compound. The picture below was taken when I was about halfway through. It didn’t turn out badly but it had loads of bashes and small dents that I couldn’t get out. It’ll do. At least it’s another original part that I’m keeping…

kick plate


The old original grey floor matting had blackened with age, wear and abuse. I thought it’d be a right pain to get off, but it peeled off very easily (I took these photos before I repaired and painted the cab)…

The sticky gluey mess it left behind came off with a quick sand…

sanding ready for new matting


And soon it was ready for the new matting to be stuck on…

sanded ready for new matting


The replacement grey matting was bought from a fellow ukvaccer. It was slightly too big so I measured up and cut it to size with a stanley knife. I then used some spray contact adhesive to carefully stick it down. When I put the pedals and the kickplate back on, it looked the business…

Onto the underside. The cab had been wobbly ever since I got it, and here’s why… a missing leg leveler…

missing leg leveler


I got a replacement chrome leg leveler from Pinball Mania and made a mounting block for it as the original batten on the base of the cab had broken off…

new mount for leg leveler


I then screwed it into the base…

mounted new leg leveler

….and tightened it from inside with a nut and a big washer…

big washer for leg leveler


Cab de-wonkified! 🙂

all leg levelers present!


Next up was the side art. I got all the repro artwork from Olly at Arcade Art Shop. Putting this on was scary. I didn’t have a helper and they’re big pieces. I clamped them in place, then started at the top peeling a bit of the backing off, then cutting a piece of the backing completely off, then sticking it back down. Then very slowly using a clean rag I pressed it on all the way to the bottom, using the rag to smooth it out and remove any air bubbles. Wow, I love this artwork… really brings the cab to life. I also stuck on the repro monitor bezel map decal that I had received from Wim Outrun….

And the final piece of artwork was the road stripe on the front panel. It looks awesome…

stripe sticker on front


Remember that North Carolina license sticker from the front panel? I managed to remove it undamaged so I stuck it on the back next to the serial number plate…

license sticker on back


While I was near the back panel, I gave the fan a good clean. Should’ve worn gloves…

cleaning the fan


Switching the cab on, I noticed that the screen was wonky. It was slightly lower on the left hand side than the right. I don’t remember this being the case before. I would need to unscrew and rotate the yoke slightly to fix it….

wonky screen


WIth the monitor fixed, I moved on to sorting out the power. It’s a US cab with a US plug running 110V. I had a massive external Goldsource step-down transformer that wouldn’t fit in the cab, so that needed replacing. I wasn’t confident enough to try to tweak the existing wiring in the cab to take 240V, so instead a friend sold me a smaller step down transformer that I could mount inside the cab.

The cab is rated at 250W. I’d found out that it only goes anwhere near that briefly during power up, and is nominal at other times. The transformer I had was rated at thermal output 200VA, with admissable instantaneous output of 500VA. That should be OK. I wired it up to a UK plug on the input side, and the US power cables coming from the cab on the output side. It worked just fine.

Following this, I conducted a thorough earth check of all the exposed metalwork. With the UK plug plugged into the step-down, I went around the cab with my meter doing continuity tests. I connected one lead on the plug’s earth pin, and went round all the exposed metal parts one by one touching them with the other lead listening for a beep. Everything was earthed as hoped/expected apart from the metal shaft on the gear shifter. I don’t remember a ever seeing ground lead coming from the shifter, so I made one and screwed it onto one of the bolts on the metal shifter frame, then ran it directly to the earth connection on the step-down transformer. Beepity beep. That’s better, I feel safer now I know everthing is properly earthed…

I installed the step-down transformer at the back of the cab in the bottom left where there was a space almost tailor-made for it. I tidied up the new earth cable from the shifter and ran it along the left side of the cabinet…

step down transformer installed


The last thing I needed to do was to fix an annoying issue that I’d noticed on the first day I bought the cab. The control panel was wonky. It was sloping down to the right slightly. I couldn’t let this be, it would totally do my head in every time I looked at it. It would have to be fixed…

wonky control panel
wonky control panel


The problem was underneath the panel where it was attached to the metal hinge. On the right hand side it was loose and the wooden panel wasn’t very secure. And I couldn’t get the bolt out… it just kept going round and round and round…

loose control panel hinge


I took the entire control panel off to investigate. It turns out the t-nut on the far right side had come loose, and the bolt had virtually welded itself to it, so it was just freely rotating instead of tightening and untightening. Using some pliers and brute force with my impact driver in reverse, I got the stuck bolt out and hammered this bugger in nice and securely so it wouldn’t move. I then used a new bolt to secure it tightly to the hinge again…

fixed t-nut


Phew, that’s much better. My OCD is satisfied. It’s rock solid now, no movement and the slope has gone…

straight control panel!


Well the cab is finished… time to get it on the sack truck ready for its short but important trip to the game room…

ready for game room


And here she is in all her glory. I’m over the moon how it went, especially considering it was my first ever restore. I learned loads and I’m looking forward to restoring more cabs in the future as I build up my gameroom arcade…

front view
side view
angled view


Thanks for reading. See you on the next restoration project, whatever that may be.

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